American History Programs

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Pearl Harbor ChildrenPEARL HARBOR CHILDREN
Presents three accounts of December 7, 1941: one of a young American girl, living on O’ahu, whose father is a civilian dock worker (Sarah Walker); one of the daughter of Mitsuo Fuchida, Japanese flight commander for the Pearl Harbor attack (Miyoko Fuchida); and the third is of a fictional nisei, Japanese-American daughter of issei, living in Hawaii with the father interned as a prisoner-of-war (Yuriko Ito.) The three stories intertwine as we learn the facts about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and its consequences. There are musical transitions using authentic music from the period.
Character Traits utilized: courage, patriotism, citizenship, fairness, respect for others, kindness, cooperation, self-respect, self-control, compassion, tolerance, diligence, generosity, cheerfulness, patience, loyalty, perseverance, virtue
SS5H4, SS5H4a, SS5H4b, ELAGSE5RL2, ELAGSE5SL1, TAES5.8b, TAES5.11

PAUL REVERE: REVOLUTIONARY MESSENGER
Join Andrew Crigler in this new one-person show featuring the story of Paul Revere and his legendary midnight right signalling the beginning of our Revolutionary War.Andrew portrays Paul in period costume. Lots of audience participation as the story enfolds. Lots of background information too on the lead up to the Battles of Lexington and Concord, with the Boston Massacre and Boston Tea Party re-enacted. Period songs included. 45 minutes with Q&A afterwards. Perfect compliment to the fourth grade social studies curriculum.
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ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, GODMOTHER TO THE WORLD
Wife, mother, newspaper columnist, speaker, UN Ambassador, human rights activist, and first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt emerged from her shell as a shy, ugly duckling to become one of our most popular and famous first ladies–a woman who made a difference. She was our first “working first lady” and a champion for those less fortunate. Our first ambassador to the United Nations, she was head of the Human Rights Commission, helping to draft the UN Mission Statement.  She travelled around the world as “GODMOTHER TO US ALL.”

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SUSAN B. ANTHONY: FAILURE IS IMPOSSIBLE2015-12-02 09.48.24
Learn about the struggles for American women to gain the right to vote, led by Susan B. Anthony, who spent her life devoted to this cause. Among her many struggles and achievements was her arrest in 1872 for voting in the presidential election and challenging the 13th,14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution. Travelling cross country, she made thousands of fiery speeches to garner support for women’s rights. For her failure was impossible. Tens of thousands of mourners attended her funeral and called her “The Mother of Us All.” This 45 minute program offers lots of audience participation and is a direct tie-in with fourth grade social studies curriculum.
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“Thank you for coming to my school. It was excellent! I recommend for you to go to every elementary school that is learning about Susan B. Anthony.” — 3rd grade student, Puckett’s Mill Elementary

john as thurgood for YA2MARSHALLING JUSTICE: THE STORY OF THURGOOD MARSHALL
Join actor John Doyle in this new one-man program with audience participation available after March 15, 2014. Celebrate the life and contributions of Thurgood Marshall, the first African American Supreme Court justice, who is well known for winning the Supreme Court case, Brown v Topeka Board of Education that tested equal but separate schools. Since the 1880′s, America had been operating under a policy of segregation, keeping the black and white races separate. By proving that separate but equal school systems are unconstitutional, via the 5th and 14th amendments, Thurgood opened the doors for desegregation and civil rights rulings in the United States. Known as “Mr. Civil Rights: and working within the framework of the law, he fought to confront discrimination wherever he found it. Join him in helping recreate his story.

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koku as mary 2

 MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE:  BUILDING ON A DREAM

Written by Cathy Kaemmerlen and performed by the highly energetic, well known actress/storyteller, Mama Koku, welcome to the latest addition in the third grade series highlighting people who made a difference in shaping our country’s history.  Born to slave parents, first in her family to receive an education, Mary McLeod Bethune went on to provide educational opportunities to African American students.  First African American woman to be a president of a college; a member of FDR’S New Deal staff; adviser to Eleanor Roosevelt, US Ambassador to the United Nations; recepient of many awards, Mary was a beloved teacher to thousands of students.  Known as “the black rose” she called herself a “diamond in the rough.”  She left behind this legacy:  I leave you faith.  I leave you hope.  I leave you love.  Follow your dreams.”

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Let's Keep It a Secret: The Writing of the U.S. ConstitutionLET’S KEEP IT A SECRET: THE WRITING OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION
Young Mary House during the summer of 1787 is sent to help her great aunt, the owner of the Indian Queen Tavern in Philadelphia, where many of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention stayed. While cleaning James Madison’s room, Mary comes across his notes taken during the sessions and “spills the beans” to her audience, who in turn play various delegates at the Constitutional Convention. Grade levels 4 and 5. Limited to 100 or one grade level.

Fourth grade Civics and Government PSA component: “the student will describe the ‘We the people’ preamble, the federal system of governments, etc.”

“You make us feel like we are stepping back in time. It has been wonderful. Thanks for getting our students interested in our Constitution.”

BUTTONS FOR GENERAL WASHINGTON/A REVOLUTIONARY SPY FOR GENERAL WASHINGTON
Buttons is for young audiences of elementary age, who have some knowledge of the colonial period and the Revolutionary War. Set in the Revolutionary War, covering the time frame of October, 1777 through late summer of 1778, this is a spy story of one Quaker family, the Darraghs of Philadelphia, who sent secret messages in code, in buttons sewn on a son’s coat. Seen through the eyes of daughter/sister Anne, who, because of her older brother John’s illness, must deliver the buttons to brother Charles, aide de camp for General George Washington. 45 minutes with question and answer period and some discussion about spying through the ages.
Character Traits utilized: courage, patriotism, citizenship, honesty, cooperation, diligence, patience, loyalty, perseverance, virtue, respect for creator

SS4H1b, SS4H1c, ELAGSE4SL1, ELAGSE4SL4, TAES4.11

NEW!!! RUBY BRIDGES GOES TO SCHOOL
What was if like to go to first grade at a school where you were the only person of color?  Meet Ruby Bridges, the first African American student to attend William Frantz Elementary in New Orleans, LA in 1960.  The United States Supreme Court had just ruled against segregation (separating the races) in America’s schools.  With the support of her mother and her faith in the goodness of people and her religious faith, Ruby was the first to test this ruling at this New Orleans school.  Accompanied by US marshals every day for the first grade, she faced significant challenges just entering the school.  But her friendship with her teacher, Barbara Henry, helped her persevere.  Hear Ruby’s story and how we are all connected, with one heart.  With storyteller/actress Mama Koku (Donna Buie.)
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“The show was fantastic and the kids had such a great learning experience!”
Fulton County First Grade Teacher

NEW!!! THE ADVENTURES OF HERNANDO DE SOTO AS TOLD BY SURVIVOR JUAN CARLOS RODRIGUEZ
This is a true adventure story of Conquistador Hernando de Soto’s exploration of La Florida, into Georgia, and the entire Southeastern United States, ending at the mouth of the Mississippi River, where he met his death.  Told by survivor, Juan Carlos Rodriguez, one of fourteen on the expedition who made it back to Spain, Rodriguez looks back on his times with de Soto, his interactions with the Native Americans, and his search for gold and glory for Spain.  With slides, audience participation, authentic chain mail costuming and conquistador helmet, learn what it was like to spend over four years of your life facing dangers and the unknown in conquering and exploring the southeastern part of the United States.  With actor Andrew Crigler.

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT: GODMOTHER TO THE WORLD
Wife, mother, newspaper columnist, speaker, UN Ambassador, human rights activist, and first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt emerged from her shell as a shy, ugly duckling to become one of our most popular and famous first ladies–a woman who made a difference. She was our first “working first lady” and a champion for those less fortunate. For third (emphasis on Eleanor, human rights activist) and fifth grades (emphasis on Eleanor and the Depression and World Depression and World War II.

SS5H3a, SS5H4, SSH4f, ELAGSE5SL1, TAES5.8b, TAES5.11

 

TURN HOMEWARD, HANNALEE
First in the series of one-woman shows by Cathy Kaemmerlen, Turn Homeward… is a dramatic presentation of the plight of one of the 400 Roswell Mill workers who were arrested under orders of General William Tecumseh Sherman in July of 1864, charged with treason for making cloth for the Confederate States of America, and shipped to Louisville, KY to live in refugee warehouses until work as servants, farmhands, or mill workers could be found. The one woman play is loosely based on the historical fiction juvenile novel by Patricia Beatty. The play documents the horrors and realities of war, particularly civil war; family devotion, love, and perseverance, that can provide strength in times that are “hilly, bumpy, and stumpy;” and it portrays the good and bad characteristics of both sides who fought in the Civil War. The play covers the nine month period from July, 1864, through April, 1865, the final months of the Civil War, and Hannalee’s adventures, including serving as an eyewitness to the Battle of Franklin, KY, as she turns homeward. 45 minutes. Grades 4 on up. Character Traits utilized: courage, honesty, kindness, cooperation, self-respect, compassion, tolerance, diligence, generosity, cheerfulness, respect for creator, patience, creativity, loyalty, perseverance, virtue
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“It sounded like you were really Hannalee. You had a lot of expression.” — Fourth grader

NEW MANCHESTER GIRL
The true story of Scynthia Catherine Stewart of New Manchester, Georgia, during and immediately after the Civil War. Scynthia, as well as others in the mill town, was charged with treason against the United States government for making cloth for the Confederate New Manchester Girl: Scynthia Catherine Stewartcause. After the Yankee soldiers burned the textile mill, she was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, along with her mother and siblings, as prisoners of war. There they were miraculously reunited with their father. After the war, they returned home to their ghost town to find wild strawberries, their manna from heaven that helped them survive that first post-war year.

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“For 45 minutes I listened spellbound at the beautiful tale you crafted about Scynthia Catherine. It brought to life portions of the book I put my heart into about five years ago.” — Ruth Beaumont Cook, author of NORTH ACROSS THE RIVER: the Civil War Trail of Tears

PILGRIM COURAGE: FROM MAYFLOWER TO FIRST HARVEST
Follow the story of the courageous pilgrim voyage of 1620 from England to the New World, continuing through the first year at Plimouth Colony, as told through the eyes of Mary Allerton, 4 years old at the time of the pilgrimage and the last living survivor of the Mayflower voyage. Hear first hand what it was like to spend 65 days at sea; the struggle to start a new settlement and survive the first winter; the impact of the Mayflower Compact; making peace with area Indians; and the first harvest feast. Performed as a first person narrative, in authentic period costuming: “One small candle may light a thousand … out of small beginnings greater things have been produced.”

SS3H2a, SS3H2c, SS3H3a, SS3H3c, ELAGSE3SL1, TAES3.11

Sacajawea SpeaksSACAJAWEA SPEAKS
A 45 minute program to celebrate the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark expedition and the contributions that Sacajawea made to the expedition that opened the Northwest Passage.  Through costume, props, visual aids, the audience will use their imaginations to aid them through this 18 month expedition that covered 11 states and thousands of miles by land and sea.  With smaller audiences, Sacajawea invites the audience to sit on “listening blankets” to hear stories about her trip and allegories (teaching stories) that she told her infant son, Pomp, who accompanied her on the journey.  Some stories included:  the silver tipped grizzly bear, overturned pirogue, near fatal flash flood, the Buffalo jump, reunion with her native trip the Shoshones, bartering for horses, and many others.  Ideally designed for audiences of 100 or less, for first and fourth grade curriculums.
Character traits utilized:  courage, honesty, respect for others, respect for environment, loyalty, perserverence, patience
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